DUPRS_0045 - P. & J. Arnold Ink bottle produced by J. Bourne & Son potters

Dublin Core

Title

DUPRS_0045 - P. & J. Arnold Ink bottle produced by J. Bourne & Son potters

Subject

Ceramic ink bottle

Description

The bottle is ceramic which appears wheel thrown due to streak marks and cut base. Brown outside probably from a sort of glaze. Base is 9 cm in diameter, equal to about 3.5 inches. Stamp-marked with the following label: Vitreous Stone Bottle; J Bourne & Son,; (indiscernible); Denby Pottery, Near Derby; P & J. Arnold; London. Unfortunately because the top of the bottle is missing, exactly what this bottle once contained cannot be determined. However, most likely the bottle held ink because P & J. Arnolds was an ink producing company. Based on the ‘Son’ on the back stamp this stone bottle dates post 1841. It was hand thrown on a wheel and glazed with common salt producing the brown glazed finish.

Creator

Vitreous Stone Bottle, held the ink produced by P. and J. Arnold
Manufactured post 1841 due to labels inclusion of & Son; between 1860-1890.
In Denby near Derbyshire England. Exported by P. & J. Arnold of London

Source

Selective Surface collection, east Stanley Park, Historic Chatham Township (modern Summit, New Jersey)

Publisher

Drew University, Department of Anthropology, Drew University Passaic River Survey

Date

Circa 1862.

Contributor

Aisha Arain

Type

Stoneware ceramic

Coverage

   These stone bottles were not high class material, comparable to our contemporary plastic storage containers, they were disposable. The people of the 1800s utilized these stone vessels to store various liquids such as ink, preserves, paste, beer, medicine, varnish, and so on. Compared to glass at the time, stoneware products were economically practical. The company that produced this bottle was named after Joseph Bourne who officially founded the company in 1809 and it continued to manufacture stone bottles until 1976. Joseph’s father William was a potter as well as who, on the horizon of the Industrial Revolution, foresaw the benefits of leasing a large clay bed near Derby which was then passed onto his son. The modest singular kiln company grew steadily over the years. Joseph Bourne’s pottery in Derbyshire England made large quantities of these bottles. For many years P. & J. Arnold of London used Bourne vessels for his ink products. For many years, P. & J. Arnold of London used bourne vessels for his ink products. These ink products, and Joseph Bourne’s containers were heavily imported to the U.S. by the mid 19th century, which could account for this artifact being found along the Passaic River in New Jersey. If there were factories in this area, records would have to be kept and ink to write them in. Bourne’s bottles were not expensive during this time period, unlike glass, and with their thriving factory during the Industrial Revolution it is doubtless their exports reached the ports of New Jersey and New York (New Amsterdam).

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Tags

Citation

Vitreous Stone Bottle, held the ink produced by P. and J. Arnold Manufactured post 1841 due to labels inclusion of & Son; between 1860-1890. In Denby near Derbyshire England. Exported by P. & J. Arnold of London , “DUPRS_0045 - P. & J. Arnold Ink bottle produced by J. Bourne & Son potters ,” Drew University Library Special Collections, accessed February 7, 2023, http://omeka.drew.edu/items/show/703.